Montana Fishing Report

Tuesday, July 22, 2014
1,080 CFS ⬆️ The Gallatin River is looking great in the Valley, however we heard that there is a mud plug up in the Canyon stretch, as a result of last nights rain. The mud will likely move it's way down into the Valley by this afternoon. The Gallatin normally takes a day or two to clear. Above the Taylor's Fork, the source of the mud, the river is clear and fishing well.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
1,520 CFS ➡️ 71.4 degrees F⬆️ The story remains the same on the Lower Madison River. Your window to fish is only a few hours in the morning. After that, the river is really getting too warm, and the survival rate of a hooked fish drops considerably. If you want to try it early in the AM, nymphing will be your best bet, although there have been a few fish eating dries now and again.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
1,140 CFS ➡️ The Upper Madison River has continued to fish quite well, especially on the upper stretches of the river. $3 Bridge area have seen some great dry fly fishing as well as consistently good nymphing. Dry fly selection mostly consists of Caddis and Epeorous Mayflies, however there are still a few PMDs and Sallies around as well. Get out early or late for the best action.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
6,410 CFS ⬇️ The Yellowstone River remains one of the best options around for the drift boat fisherman. It is still a bit high for wading, but out of the boat it is perfect. Nymphing remains the go-to method of fish catching, however they have been getting them on streamers and dries as well. Sculpins, Buggers, Stoneflies, and small attractors are getting the job done sub-surface.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
4,570 CFS ➡️The Missouri River continues to be one the best fishing rivers around. Dry fly fishing has been good, excellent at times, with PMDs, Sallies, Tricos, Caddis, and don't be scared to try Mr. Hopper. Nymphing will get you into the best numbers of fish, so when the dry fly action slows you always have that to try. Lightning bugs, Damselfly nymphs, and small Mayfly nymphs.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
The Spring Creeks have entered their tough, technical dry fly fishing period. The water is low and clear, and the fish have seen enough flies to know what's real and what's not. That's not to say that you cant fool them, because you certainly can. PMDs, Caddis, and Sulphurs are the main hatches currently, so pick your flies wisely and make a great first cast. Get 'em on the first cast.
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